Individual plants will do fine with a 6- to 8-inch pot. You can move your containers into an unheated garage or under a deck for winter protection. This article was co-authored by Maggie Moran. Remember to rotate the container every week. Keep the containers in an unheated garage, basement, or room. But you also don't want them to remain dry for days and start to wilt, especially while the fruits are forming. However, everbearing strawberries are not as hardy as the day-neutral varieties and will need protection to make it through cold winters. You really have two option when it comes to protecting potted strawberries – bringing them indoors, or digging the pots into the ground for winter. Most strawberry plants will stop producing fruit after 3 to 4 years. This article has been viewed 348,953 times. For garden planting, plant 15" apart in the row with 3-4' between rows. Strawberries also look lovely in hanging baskets or ceramic pots. Without the thick and insulating properties of the ground surrounding their roots, strawberries in pots will often see their root temperature rise with the temperature of the surrounding soil. To grow strawberries in a pot, start by purchasing a starter plant or a runner from a nursery, along with a pot that’s 16 to 18 inches wide and 8 inches deep. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania. How can I save my runners if they have roots and are dry? Keep the pot away from windy areas and feel the soil often to see if it is dry. Fill the container with a loose, loamy potting mix that will hold moisture but quickly drain away any excess water. If you would not like to grow more strawberries, then you can simply remove the runners. What is the best fertilizer for a strawberry plant in a pot? The green, thickened stem (called the crown) should sit just above the surface of the soil while the top of the roots should sit just below the surface. Learned things I wasn't aware of. Strawberry Plant Sort out. Last Updated: June 4, 2020 Add more potting mix as needed after the soil settles from watering. Strawberries produce best if they are allowed to go dormant in the winter. 10: Strawberry plants have a short life. If you decide to use a hanging box, it is important to make sure that the plant does not dry out easily. These vigorous everbearing plants produce white flowers, and they do best in full sun in Zones 6-8. Either several drainage holes at the bottom of the container or multiple holes throughout the container will do. Yes, you can grow them indoors. For large and heavy pots, load the bottom of the pot with small rocks or ceramic pieces. I have never had a plant before, so, "Very helpful since this was my first time planting strawberries and I didn't want to have to start them straight in, "I love this website because it's so useful and detailed. Thank you. Strawberries can be bought as potted plants or bare-rooted runners. If birds are eating your berries, drape a net or mesh over the plant to keep them away. During the growing season, you will want to use fertilizer every 10 days. ", getting ready to plant their first strawberry pot. Choosing the Right Type of Plant. Perpetual/everbearing strawberry ‘Buddy’ growing in a terracotta planter ‘Buddy’ is a newer, everbearing variety with very sweet fruits on plants with good disease-resistance and weather tolerance. For more tips from our Horticultural reviewer, like how to harvest strawberries, read on! The selection of fertilizer should be done according to requirements of plant. Watering the base of the plant and not the leaves can help prevent fungus from growing. Day-neutral plants (which produce multiple small harvests) or everbearing plants (which produce 2 harvests a year) are ideal for growing in containers. If standing water remains in the pot after you’ve watered, cut back on how much water you give the plants. Insects, birds, and rodents will still be attracted to your plants, so keep them protected with netting or fencing. Then, cover the roots up to the crown with the potting mix, and water the soil well. There are several types of pots available. References It will. Winterizing strawberry pots in cold climates can be accomplished by putting the pots in a cool garage or cellar, or by removing the plants from the pot, planting them in plastic pots and planting those pots in the ground up to the top rim of the pots (leaving the plants exposed). £4.99. Place the strawberries plants under it for 6-10 hours a day. Because June-bearing strawberry plants produce a singular crop of strawberries in spring to early summer, late spring frosts can damage or kill the fruit. You should only place one to two plants in small containers, but you can fill all the openings of a strawberry jar (a planter crafted specifically for growing strawberries). Approved. Check growing almanacs for the last expected frost date in your area. To plant your strawberries, you’ll need to consider the type of container, and where you’ll put it. Here is a Step by Step Guide on How to Grow Strawberries on Pots 1. These strawberry planters also produced the highest yield of strawberries, in our trial. Strawberries have a natural habit of hanging down so growing in containers is a perfect match. How can I keep them from laying in the dirt as they grow? It was helpful to learn the proper way of planting by making, "I got a strawberry plant from an Earth Day celebration after making a donation. This will give them necessary nutrients for growth. A strawberry pot is a particularly great way to grow strawberries if space is a consideration. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/9a\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-01.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-01.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/9a\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-01.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-01.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/6c\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-02.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-02.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/6c\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-02.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-02.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/30\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-03.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-03.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/30\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-03.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-03.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-04.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-04.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/3\/33\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-04.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-04.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/55\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-05.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-05.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/55\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-05.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-05.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/81\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-06.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-06.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/81\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-06.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-06.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/64\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-07.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-07.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/64\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-07.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-07.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/6\/6f\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-08.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-08.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/6\/6f\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-08.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-08.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/8b\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-09.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-09.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/8b\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-09.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-09.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/49\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-10-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-10-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/49\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-10-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-10-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, Leading gardening charity in the U.K. providing resources for identifying, growing and caring for flowers and other plants, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/8\/86\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-11-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-11-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/8\/86\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-11-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-11-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, Electronic database of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences's peer-reviewed articles, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/7\/7e\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-12-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-12-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/7\/7e\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-12-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-12-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/4\/41\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-13-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-13-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/4\/41\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-13-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-13-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/9\/99\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-14-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-14-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/9\/99\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-14-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-14-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/1b\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-15-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-15-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/1b\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-15-Version-2.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-15-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f2\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-16.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-16.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f2\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-16.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-16.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}, {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/5\/56\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-17.jpg\/v4-460px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-17.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/5\/56\/Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-17.jpg\/aid2132386-v4-728px-Grow-Strawberries-in-a-Pot-Step-17.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

License: Creative Commons<\/a>
\n<\/p>


\n<\/p><\/div>"}. At temperatures you are likely to encounter in the fall, PVC pipe is flexible so it can be bent into hoops and attached to a frame built around the plants. Plus, strawberry plants provide both beauty and fruit. Also, make sure the plants are protected. These non-runner strawberry plants are well suited to the confinement of a strawberry pot. A quonset hut frame is built from PVC pipe. Just because the strawberries are in pots doesn't mean pests can't reach them. During fruit season, they need an average of 1-2 inches of water every day. ", "How to plant strawberries in a pot helped.". This article has been viewed 348,953 times. There are 19 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. You also might be able to mulch up and around the container and leave it in place. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 348,953 times. Pin the small plantlet on the stalk into the soil using a hairpin or a piece of wire. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. Give your plant 6 to 10 hours of sunlight a day and water it whenever the soil is dry. Most container plants benefit from some supplemental feeding. Introducing "One Thing": A New Video Series, The Spruce Gardening & Plant Care Review Board, The Spruce Renovations and Repair Review Board. Ever bearing seeds bud during the summer flower and fruit in the autumn and fruit the following spring. If the sunlight is coming from only one direction, rotate the container every three to four days if possible for the plants to grow evenly. Runners look like little pieces of roots with very few leaves. ", the ground. These plants simply require a wide, shallow pot, rich soil, and plenty of sunlight. Try cutting off the brown leaves, and water the plant only when it will dry before nightfall. Any type of strawberry can produce fruits when grown in containers. Place landscaping fabric on top before filling with soil. Feed your strawberries every three to four weeks with a liquid fertilizer that is high in phosphorous. The kind of pot you choose will greatly impact how healthy your plants will grow, and the frequency of watering your plants will need.. You can choose to use plastic pots with drainage holes to prevent water logging. The plants should then be covered over with a lose layer of straw. Be careful not to overwater your strawberries. The best time to plant them is in the spring, when the ground is the easiest to work with, although some seeds are best planted in certain temperature ranges. They require an average of 6 hours of sun each day, although they won't do well in full shade either. This article was co-authored by Maggie Moran. June bearing seeds bud in the autumn, flower and fruits in the spring, and are runners during summer. How much space should I leave around each strawberry plant? Good to know now to keep the soil moist. To grow strawberries in a pot, start by purchasing a starter plant or a runner from a nursery, along with a pot that’s 16 to 18 inches wide and 8 inches deep. 9: After every 3 to 4 weeks, you should provide liquid fertilizer in your strawberry containers which should have high content of phosphorus. Keep potted strawberries away from tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplants, as these are common carriers of fungus that can spread to strawberries. Learn tips for creating your most beautiful (and bountiful) garden ever. Day-neutral plants produce berries sporadically throughout the summer, and everbearing strawberries will give you two to three harvests each season.

2020 everbearing strawberry plants in pots